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Ending Violence Against Women

Across cultures and countries and throughout their lives, women and girls are at risk of experiencing many forms of violence. Gender inequality and poverty intertwine to make women of all ages and girls more vulnerable to physical, sexual and emotional violence. In Sub-Saharan Africa, violence against women is both a cause and a consequence of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, making grandmothers and the children in their care particularly vulnerable. Canada is a signatory to a number of international conventions to end violence and discrimination against women. In public statements the government has committed to ending all forms of violence against women at home and abroad. Through the Violence Against Women Working Group, GRAN identifies opportunities to advocate for policies and programs that will have a positive impact for the grandmothers of sub Saharan Africa who bear a disproportionate burden, and the devastating consequences, of violence directed toward women and girls.

The Orange Campaign

Each year the United Nations’ campaign, UNiTE to End Violence against Women invites governments, civil society organizations, and individuals to mark the 16 Days of Activism (November 25 to December 10) by increasing awareness, and calling on governments to match action and adequate resources to their political commitments to end violence against women and girls. The UNiTE Campaign uses the colour ORANGE as a uniting theme symbolizing a brighter future.

Child, Early and Forced Marriage

Child, Early and Forced Marriage (CEFM) is a human rights violation which has devastating consequences for women and girls in sub-Saharan Africa and around the world.  It perpetuates the gender inequality that grandmothers in sub-Saharan Africa and elsewhere experience throughout their lives.  It increases the spread of HIV/AIDS and creates barriers to education, economic security, healthcare and safety – challenges identified by African grandmothers for themselves and their grandchildren.