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Schools do not exist in social isolation from their communities.  The way teachers behave can reflect the beliefs, attitudes and prejudices existing in the wider society around them. Education and its teachers have a central role to play in challenging the negative social norms that drive gender-based violence and to ending violence in schools and in their communities.  Read more to find out how teachers can be a strong force in the fight to end gender-based violence.

 

We can let our decision makers in Ottawa know that we want to support the building of strong national education systems with well trained teachers in sub-Saharan Africa.  Consider leaving a phone message to Minister of International Development Marie-Claude Bibeau’s office  to support funding for the Global Partnership for Education.   A sample message.  

 

 

 

 

According to the UN, young women between the ages of 15 and 24 are twice as likely to become infected with HIV as young men of the same age. In eastern and southern Africa, young women account for more than 25% of new HIV infections even though they only make up 10% of the population. Why is this happening?  For one thing, there is no easy way for many of these young women to protect themselves against HIV during sex. It is time to invest in providing women with options for HIV prevention that they can control.  Promising new technologies and Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy offer new hope, says Lebogang Motsumi, a South African HIV activist.  Find out more about the role Canada can play .

Can you even imagine for a moment what your life would be like if you could not read?  Florence Cheptoo, who lives in a village in rural Kenya, learned to read at age 60 when her granddaughter began to bring books home from school.   

Where there is a school and a library in a community, they become central places for learning.  There are resources in the community when grandmothers and others advocate for literacy training. Teachers will often offer literacy classes for those in the community who wish to learn. 

Florence’s world has opened up and she now has more control over her own life.  Read more about Florence’s literacy journey .

We can let our Members of Parliament know that we want to support the building of strong national education systems in sub-Saharan Africa.  Consider writing a letter to your MP to support funding for the Global Partnership for Education.   A sample letter

While Trump and the actions of media celebrities dominate the headlines, global statistics related to violence, education and the reproductive rights of women and girls receive less attention. explaining why these facts should spark outrage and how a new global campaign aims to change them.   aims to stand up, change the rules and unlock resources to enhance the fundamental rights of each and every woman and girl to decide what she does with her body and with whom. 

 

 

 

 

This Thanksgiving, we Canadians have so much to be thankful for.  Many of us are grateful  for the wonderful teachers that have influenced us and given us the knowledge and tools to become who we are today….. women and men with freedom of choice and opportunity,  who can fully participate in our society and direct our own future.


Teachers all over the world are shaping the future for millions of children, particularly those that need it most.    was marked on October 5th.  Let's take this opportunity to look at how the work of the Global Partnership for Education is supporting teaching and learning all over the world. 

 

According to environmental activist Paul Hawken of Project Drawdown, the number one solution to global warming is not an innovative clean energy technology, but the empowering of women and girls. 

Learn more about the data that has led to this astonishing conclusion by listening to Hawken in a .  

You may also wish to visit the Project Drawdown website to find out more about these gender-based solutions for climate change.  Click each link below to access information on the impact on climate of:

 

5,000,000 Canadian children will head back to school this week to well-trained teachers, a holistic curriculum, the latest technology and new friends.  But almost 100,000,000 sub-Saharan children will not be stepping foot inside a school this year.  They face innumerable challenges to access a quality education such as early marriage, conflict situations, and gender norms.   from the Global Partnership for Education to learn more about the many barriers children and young people around the world face this September when trying to access a quality education.

The G20 Leaders' Declaration in Hamburg, Germany on July 8th included a commitment to step up and improve education financing.  Now, all that is needed is commitment, innovative thinking, and leadership to deliver.  A first step for Canada is to commit $260 million to the Global Partnership for Education (GPE) replenishment (2018-2020) scheduled for the beginning of 2018.

Summer is a good time to meet up with your MP to celebrate the G20 promise and to chat about how Canada will help deliver this promise.

To read more about this historic recognition of education at the G20, read Julia Gillard’s statement .

 

In his column in the National Post on June 14, Terry Glavin writes about Canada’s new Feminist International Assistance Policy.  Glavin says, “It's easy to dismiss Trudeau's 'feminist foreign aid' plan as virtue signalling. Easy, but wrong,” He goes on to say, “What the Trudeau government is proposing is not frivolous. Two years ago, the McKinsey Global Institute produced a ground-breaking study reckoning that $12 trillion could be added to the world’s GDP by advancing the cause of women’s equality. The McKinsey study built on the work of numerous scholars that shows how women’s equality is the most significant predictor of a country’s stability.”  
 
To read Glavin’s full column, .    

To read Global Affairs Canada’s backgrounder on the new feminist policy,

And you can find further information about the McKinsey study, by .

Minister Marie-Claude Bibeau announces Canada's first feminist International Assistance Policy, with a focus on gender equality and women's rights, support for local women’s organizations, and a commitment to a minimum of 50% of bilateral aid directed to Sub-Saharan African countries by 2021-22.  A bold new vision and approach. GRAN applauds this new vision and looks forward to seeing new resources to match this ambitious plan.

“This is an important first big step towards changing the way Canada’s delivers aid—from treating women as beneficiaries of aid to partners for change,” said Nobel Women’s Initiative’s Acting Executive Director, Rachel Vincent, “Canada is showing the world that investing in women and gender equality is an essential to bring about peace and security around the globe—and that benefits everyone, including Canadians.”

to read more positive reaction to Canada's global leadership from the Nobel Women's Initiative. 

To help spread the good news, you can find sample Facebook/Instagram and Twitter posts .

 

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